RECOMMENDED RESOURCES


The Recommended Resources listed on the Guidance Note are now AVAILABLE AT ONCE for download as PDFs (Link) – except the ones that are Web Pages or Web Publications (see individual links below, on former posts).


Each post below relates to one entry on the Recommended Resources listed on the Guidance Note. They are all organized by CATEGORIES (key-words, main themes) and TAGGED (countries and organizations). After clicking the title of a post, if you are interested on a category (below the summary, following “posted in”) or a tag (below the summary, following “tagged”) just click either of them and references connected to the same category or tag will be filtered and shown.

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(Popular CATEGORIES & TAGS on this Platform!)

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[SUPPORTING MATERIAL]: Report on Assessment of Gaps and Needs for Institutional Strengthening of Sub-National Levels in WASH Sector in Cambodia

We greatly appreciate the team of GoAL WaSH in Cambodia, a Project from SIWI and UNDP,  for sharing  the report assessment, a workshop report, and a short presentation with us. This is a particularly relevant piece of work, because it tackles both the sub-national level and EE assessment! So far, the project has been implemented only in 4 out of 26 cities in Cambodia that aimed to scale up nationwide when the guideline (in development) is finished. They consider to disseminate this guideline to sub-national level including schools throughout the country by involving stakeholders that could organize the cascade training to local authorities. Check it out!!

[SUPPORTING MATERIAL]: UNICEF Pakistan WASH Strategic Review & SDG6 and The Way Forward in Pakistan

We highly appreciate the UNICEF Team in Pakistan for sharing with us the Concept Note for EE linking with HLPD and PF4C and a related presentation – they have started using a few tools like WASHBAT and have developed this Concept Note. This is a great piece of work & we invite you to go to our Yammer SEE4WASH Group, ask questions about it, and engage with the team!

[SUPPORTING MATERIAL]: Promising Approach – Role of Sanctions and Rewards in Enhancing Water and Sanitation Service Delivery in Kenya

Strengthening the EE for WASH in subnational/district levels has been recently highlighted as a key outcome for partners and donors. It’s an important focus to guide our WASH programming. We’ve brought here a short but interesting video about the role of sanctions and rewards in enhancing WASH service delivery in Kenya, from the Water Governance Facility web page (UNDP; SIWI; FORUM SYD). Examples of addressing the EE for WASH to improve and scale up sustainable WASH service delivery are growing and it’d be relevant to collectively discuss them.  Please, share your experiences!

[Suporting Material]: Vietnam Case Study Scaling Up Rural Sanitation to Reach Ethnic Minorities in Rural Vietnam

East-Asia and the Pacific Regional Office (EAPRO) from UNICEF, Equity Case Studies Publication, presents a success case on reaching the Ethnic Minorities in Rural Vietnam. This (Link) – also, see below! – shows how Government commitment and action to initiate legal reforms were identified as vital to the creation of enabling environments within which equity-focused programming could flourish. Showing the results of programming and policy changes in regards to Rural Water Supply and Sanitation (2011-2015), the development of the Guideline for Planning and Implementation for Rural Sanitation (2013), and the outcome of a bottleneck analysis with efforts from the Government and UNICEF (2013-3014), this case study is a clear and great example of the significant results achieved (and in a considerable short time-frame!) when you approach challenges in the sector also by strengthening the enabling environment for WASH.

With smart investments and targeted actions, every child can have a fair chance in life. The four case studies show how governments in East Asia and the Pacific have successfully implemented programmes that address inequity for children. Each case study details how a government reoriented its social services to focus on the most disadvantaged and socially marginalized children, and how this choice dramatically improved the life chances for individual children, to the benefit of their nation. The Governments of China, Indonesia, Kiribati, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu and Vietnam have clearly demonstrated that inequities can be reduced with simple, well-informed policies, well-targeted programmes, and mutually beneficial partnerships. The ‘Scaling up Rural Sanitation’ initiative, which is supporting ethnic minority communities in rural Vietnam to improve sanitation and hygiene practices has emphasized the use of culturally appropriate messaging locally driven interventions and participatory approaches. In terms of success factors, it was found that national governments were particularly committed when local evidence was gathered and presented by national experts, and when this evidence provided a sound basis for monitoring results, thus supporting decision-making and wider roll out of programmes. (Link)


UNICEF. 2016. Vietnam Case Study Scaling Up Rural Sanitation to Reach Ethnic Minorities in Rural Vietnam. In: A Fair Start for Every Child – How six governments in East Asia and the Pacific solved some of the most stubborn problems facing marginalized children. 42-49 pp.

[Supporting Material]: Gender Mainstreaming: Improving Water Supply in Vanuatu Women in Key Roles

One of the key outcomes of the use of the WASH BAT in Madagascar was that the WASH sector needed to evolve rapidly from providing infrastructure to a service delivery culture. A national campaign on sanitation and hygiene was believed to be required to highlight the issue and to focus on behaviour change, targeting women and children particularly, and ensuring that equity and poverty issues were addressed. This material presents an innovative and promising initiative ongoing from WASH colleagues in Pacific/Vanuatu, featured in the EAPRO Gender Newsletter (Feb 2017). If you know of other ways to strengthen gender in WASH, kindly lets us know!

This brief shows an innovative and promising initiative ongoing from WASH colleagues in Pacific/Vanuatu, featured in the EAPRO Gender Newsletter (Feb 2017). Despite Government commitments to equality and the advancement of women and girls, progress towards gender equality in Vanuatu has been slow. Men dominate in leadership and political positions, evident by the fact that no women have been elected to parliament for over a decade. Women are generally not permitted to take part in decision-making processes, especially in regards to resources. However, females play a key role in fetching water, collecting up to 2/3 of the water, but they are under-represented in water user committees: of the 2,237 committee members only 16% are female. This brief summarizes a promising practice that showcases gender mainstreaming in WASH programming in the region. UNICEF Vanuatu utilised the power of data to encourage greater female leadership in water systems management. Data was used to highlight the benefits women bring to the efficiency of Water User Committees when they hold key decision-making positions. (Link)


UNICEF. 2017. Gender Mainstreaming: Improving Water Supply in Vanuatu Women in Key Roles. 2 p.

[Supporting Material]: WASH Accountability Mapping Tools – Accountability for Sustainability Partnership

This brochure provides an overview of methods for assisting groups in understanding accountability relations in their WASH context and planning improvement actions. It has been produced under the “Accountability for Sustainability” programme, a partnership between the UNDP/SIWI Water Governance Facility and UNICEF which aims to increase the sustainability of WASH interventions by enhancing accountability in the service delivery framework. The Accountability mapping tools are built upon the accountability framework, the generic set-up of institutional responsibilities in public service provision. These tools can be conducted as a quick accountability mapping at the sector level, or as an in-depth accountability diagnosis at the service delivery level. They have proved successful in stimulating debates on the governance, scope and solutions to unsustainable benefits of WASH programmes. It encourages WASH professionals to reflect on these issues, and to look for new ways to improve the sustainability of programmes. In particular, it has been successfully conducted during WASH-BAT exercises to facilitate sector diagnosis and prioritization. (Link)


UNICEF, UNDP Water Governance Facility at the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI). 2016. WASH Accountability Mapping Tools – Accountability for Sustainability Partnership. 5 p.

[Supporting Material]: WASH Accountability Mapping Tools: Facilitator Guide – Accountability for Sustainability Partnership

The Facilitator Guide provides methods to help groups understand accountability relations in their WASH context and plan improvement actions. It has been produced under the “Accountability for Sustainability” programme, a partnership between the UNDP/SIWI Water Governance Facility and UNICEF which aims to increase the sustainability of WASH interventions by enhancing accountability in the service delivery framework. This guide provides an outline on how to conduct a simple Accountability Mapping or a more in-depth diagnosis of accountability challenges and solutions. The type of tool chosen should match the needs of the participants. The tools are flexible enough to be adapted to various contexts and situations. Sessions, learning objectives and expected outcomes are clearly explained, with timings, steps, and materials laid out. (Link)


Avello, A.; LeDeunff, H.; Jiménez, A.; Scharp, C.; Canuto, J. G. 2016. WASH Accountability Mapping Tools: Facilitator Guide – Accountability for Sustainability Partnership. UNICEF, UNDP Water Governance Facility at the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI). 9 p.

[Supporting Material]: Accountability for Sustainability

The partnership between UNICEF and the Water Governance Facility at SIWI aims to provide UNICEF and UNDP WASH staff with the accountability tools and guidance they need to achieve improved governance and thereby help shape programmes to deliver increased sustainability. This webpage states the goals, challenges, opportunities, strategies, and impacts of the Programme. It also makes available resources and media coverage. (Link)


UNICEF, UNDP Water Governance Facility at the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI). 2017. Accountability for Sustainability. Web Page. [Accessed in February, 2017].

1. An Agenda for Change: Achieving Universal Access to Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) by 2030 – Working Paper

The agreement of a Sustainable Development Goal 6 (SDG 6) target of universal access to water, sanitation and hygiene by 2030 requires a fundamental change in the way the sector works. Delivering positive change in sector performance necessitates a system-wide approach that tackles all dimensions – policy, financing, institutions, and other key building blocks – of the water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) sector as whole. This will require a reform agenda, based on a sound understanding of the political economy, at three levels of decision-making: city or district, national, and global. Recognising that more will be achieved by working together, this paper sets out some of the necessary principles that should guide this approach at each level, in order to ensure permanent water and sanitation services for all. (Link)


Aguaconsult; IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre; WaterAid; Water for People. 2015. An Agenda for Change: Achieving Universal Access to Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) by 2030 – Working Paper. 5p.